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transfiguration

by Stephanie Inagaki

One of the best things a friend told me this past year, while dealing with this grief, is that no matter what, I can keep loving from afar, and that gave me some release and reprieve. That however hard the decision was that I made, I don’t have to feel conflicted about the love I continue to feel. Life isn’t black and white but a muddled maelstrom of love, difficulties, happiness, death, anger, hope… we don’t get to choose what comes at us, but we definitely have a choice in how we feel and deal with it.

This is in conversation with my first drawing, “Hope and Love” which is inspired by loss, the subsequent grief and hope, and Japanese concepts of musubi and kintsukuroi. The red thread of fate that connects two people is called musubi in Japanese. Musubi has numerous meanings from connecting people, representing the flow of time, knotting- which is also time, unraveling – breaking – connecting human life again. Kintsukuroi means golden repair or more popularly written as kintsugi – golden joinery, the idea to mend something with gold to repair and embrace the flaws.

Framing courtesy of Museum Quality Framing. The drawing is framed with museum glass, spacers, acid free backing and is ready to hang with hooks included.

Product Framed: 12" x 10.5"
Product Medium: Charcoal
Product Medium: gold leaf
Product Medium: Watercolor
Product Surface: Rives BFK

$500 $500

Out of stock

A Southern California native, Stephanie Inagaki received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture from Boston University's College of Fine Arts and her Master of Fine Arts in Sculpture from the San Francisco Art Institute. After studying abroad in Italy and living in major cities around the United States, she has returned to her roots to establish herself as a multifaceted artist in Los Angeles.